Seattle Press
Community Log & News Digest
Comments on items posted in the Editor's Log are welcome in the Forum and via the Comment link following each article (members only). Selected items by participating bloggers are also posted to the Community Log as indicated by the by-line beneath the respective articles. Arts reviews and commentaries may include opinions by the writers that are not necessarily shared by the editors or publishers.
Veterans Day to Celebrate 100 Years since World War I
Olympia – On November 11, 2018 the world and Washington State will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armistice that ended the fighting in World War I at 11:00 a.m., November 11, 1918 -- the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

The Thurston County Veterans Council (TCVC) and Washington Department of Veterans Affairs will host an Armistice (Veterans) Day and World War I Centennial event in the Rotunda of the Capitol Building in Olympia starting at 10:30 a.m. on November 11, 2018.

Washington State will also join the world to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armistice with a tolling of the Bells of Peace at 11:00 a.m. The tolling of a bell is a traditional expression of honor and remembrance of those who served in World War I on Armistice Day. A Bells of Peace mobile application is also available via Itunes and the Google Play Store.

The event will feature guest speakers Governor Jay Inslee, Congressman Denny Heck and Major General Willard Burleson, the Commander of the 7th Infantry Division on Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

World War I history tables will be set up by the Washington State Historical Society, Friends of Kilroy (military history group), the Fort Lewis Museum and others during the event. Various military vehicles will also be on display for the public.

Washington State is home to more than 593,000 veterans, 60,000 active duty military, 19,000 National Guard and Reserves and their families.

There are many events taking place across the state and the Washington Department of Veterans Affairs asked organizations to provide event information which is shared in a list at http://www.dva.wa.gov/list-2018-veterans-day-ww1-centennial-events-wa-state. Governor Inslee Proclamations can also be found at this link.

To see other Veterans Day Events and Celebrations happening statewide visit the following link.

Veterans Day Events

State unemployment rate falls to new low
OLYMPIA – Washington’s economy added 4,500 jobs in September and the state’s seasonally adjusted monthly unemployment rate for September was 4.4 percent according to the Employment Security Department. The September unemployment rate decreased slightly from the August 2018 unemployment rate of 4.5 percent, making it the lowest rate recorded based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics data series dating back to 1976.

“The state’s labor market is strong,” said Paul Turek, economist for the department. “Employers have been adding jobs to where most workers seeking one have been able to find one.”

The national unemployment rate dropped slightly to 3.7 percent in September. In September 2017, the national unemployment rate was 4.2 percent.

Employment Security paid unemployment insurance benefits to 44,558 people in September.

State’s labor force continued to grow

The state’s labor force in September was 3,770,900 – an increase of 5,200 people from the previous month. In the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region, the labor force increased by 1,900 over the same period. From September 2017 through September 2018, the state’s labor force grew by 19,300 and the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region increased by 22,600. The labor force is the total number of people, both employed and unemployed, over the age of 16.

Eight industry sectors expanded, two remained unchanged and three contracted

Private sector employment increased by 3,900 while the public sector added 600 jobs in September. This month’s report shows the greatest private job growth occurred in retail trade up 2,100, education & health services up 2,000, financial activities up 1,700 and manufacturing up 1,400. Other sectors adding jobs were government up 600, other services up 500, information up 300 and transportation, warehousing & utilities up 100.

The number of jobs in both the mining & logging as well as professional & business services sectors remained constant in September.

Leisure & hospitality experienced the biggest reduction in September losing 2,500 jobs while construction lost 1,400 jobs and wholesale trade lost 300 jobs.

Year-over-year growth maintains strong trend

Washington added an estimated 99,700 new jobs from September 2017 through September 2018, not seasonally adjusted. The private sector grew by 3.5 percent, up an estimated 97,100 jobs, while public sector employment increased by 0.5 percent with a net gain of 2,600 jobs.

From September 2017 through September 2018, all thirteen industry sectors added jobs.

The three industry sectors with the largest employment gains year-over-year, not seasonally adjusted, were:

  • Professional & business services with 24,000 new jobs;
  • Construction with 11,700 new jobs and
  • Education & health services with 15,200 new jobs


The Employment Security Department released the preliminary job estimates from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics as part of its Monthly Employment Report. The department also announced that August’s previously reported unemployment rate of 4.5 was confirmed. However, August’s preliminary estimated gain of 9,100 jobs was revised upward to a gain of 9,400 jobs.
No Urgency to Confirm Kavanaugh
The greater issue in the current debate about the Supreme Court is not the validity of charges against Brett Kavanaugh. It is rather the deviation of the McConnell Senate from established practice.

First, there is no hurry. After the death of Justice Scalia, no hearing on a new associate justice was held for several months for purely political reasons. A delay in consenting to a nomination will have essentially no effect on American jurisprudence. I am unaware of any life and death issues awaiting the Court when it reconvenes in October that cannot be adjudicated by eight justices. The Chief Justice is able to defer action and manage the docket to bring cases before the bench as he pleases.

Second, seven of the nine justices are over 60; three are over 75, so it is likely that the President will have other opportunities to nominate justices. We should not be surprised when he nominates conservatives. Elections have consequences.

Third, should the accusations against Judge Kavanaugh be unproven, he could be renominated at any time. The rejection of a nomination does not prevent the President from renominating that person to the Court or any other position at a later time. It would probably be a foolish move, but reflect on the past 18 months. That means that if Mr. Kavanaugh is as good a jurist as the President and other supporters assert, we might be blessed with the sunshine of his rulings and opinions later rather than sooner.

All that cannot, of course, diminish the scorn toward Sen. Crassly (misspelling intentional) and his confrères stemming from their asinine and condescending behavior of the past few days. Once again, the sequel to Profiles in Courage will remain unwritten.
Labor market continued to improve in August
OLYMPIA – Washington’s economy added 9,100 jobs in August and the state’s seasonally adjusted monthly unemployment rate for August was 4.5 percent according to the Employment Security Department. The August unemployment rate decreased slightly from the July 2018 unemployment rate of 4.6 percent and is the lowest rate for August since 1976.

“The state data continues to demonstrate the positive trends in its economy,” said Paul Turek, economist for the department. “The civilian labor force is up in August, and total unemployment is down, both month-to-month and over the year.”

The Employment Security Department released the preliminary job estimates from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics as part of its Monthly Employment Report.

The department also announced that July’s previously reported unemployment rate of 4.6 was confirmed. However, July’s preliminary estimated gain of 12,400 jobs was revised downward to a gain of 11,800 jobs.

The national unemployment rate remained at 3.9 percent in August. In August 2017, the national unemployment rate was 4.4 percent.

Employment Security paid unemployment insurance benefits to 44,845 people in August.

State’s labor force continued to grow

The state’s labor force in August was 3,766,000 – an increase of 2,800 people from the previous month. In the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region, the labor force decreased by 300 over the same period.

From August 2017 through August 2018, the state’s labor force grew by 22,800 and the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region increased by 25,800.

The labor force is the total number of people, both employed and unemployed, over the age of 16.

Nine industry sectors expanded, one remained unchanged and three contracted

Private sector employment increased by 9,300 while the public sector lost 200 jobs in August.

This month’s report shows the greatest private job growth occurred in professional & business services up 3,300, construction up 2,900 and leisure & hospitality up 2,200. Other sectors adding jobs were information up 700, wholesale trade and education & health services both up 300, transportation, warehousing & utilities and financial activities both up 200 and other services up 100.

The number of jobs in the mining and logging sector remained constant in August.

Retail trade experienced the biggest reduction in August losing 800 jobs while government lost 200 jobs and manufacturing lost 100 jobs.

Year-over-year growth maintains strong trend

Washington added an estimated 109,400 new jobs from August 2017 through August 2018, not seasonally adjusted. The private sector grew by 3.9 percent, up an estimated 107,200 jobs, while public sector employment increased by 0.4 percent with a net gain of 2,200 jobs.

From August 2017 through August 2018, all thirteen industry sectors added jobs.

The three industry sectors with the largest employment gains year-over-year, not seasonally adjusted, were:
Professional & business services with 26,300 new jobs;
Construction with 15,300 new jobs and
Education & health services with 5,200 new jobs

Note: The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently updated its “alternative measures of labor underutilization,” or U-6 rate, for states to include the second quarter of 2018. The U-6 rate considers not only the unemployed population in the official U-3 unemployment rate, but also “the underemployed and those not looking but wanting a job.” The U-6 rate for Washington through the second quarter 2018 was 8.9 percent compared to the national rate of 8.1 percent. Washington’s U-6 rate is the lowest it has been since 2007.
Trump Supportive of Georgia Police
President D.J. Tr*mp weighed in today on the recent use of a taser by police officers in Georgia on an 87-year-old woman who was cutting dandelions in her neighborhood.

While snipping the salad greens, the woman was acosted by three armed officers, including the local police chief, who ordered her to drop the kitchen knife she had been using. As a non-English speaker, she did not understand their commands, she reported later. After failing to drop her knife she was tasered by one of the officers. She was hospitalized and released and is recovering at home. Charges are pending according to the chief, who immediately defended his valiant team.

"This is just another example of how we must be vigilant where foreign-born people are concerned," Tr*mp asserted in a tweet seconds after being informed of the incident. "Before criticizing police, we should remember what happened to that girl in Nebraska," he added, giving no details.

"If she didn't speak English, she should have said 'I don't speak English' or something" he emphasized with yet another of the logical pearls for which he is well known and admired by his supporters. "Today dandelions, tomorrow who knows; okra, collards?" he concluded.

(Fox News did not contribute to this report, stylistic similarities notwithstanding. —The Editors)

Source material

WA Adds 12,400 Jobs in July
OLYMPIA – Washington’s economy added 12,400 jobs in July and the state’s seasonally adjusted monthly unemployment rate for July was 4.6 percent according to the Employment Security Department. The July unemployment rate decreased slightly from the June 2018 unemployment rate of 4.7 percent, matching a historical low.

“The state continues to feel the positive impact its economy is having on employment,” said Paul Turek, economist for the department. “Benchmark revisions to the data showed that job growth has accelerated with the beginning of the calendar year.”

The Employment Security Department released the preliminary job estimates from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics as part of its Monthly Employment Report.

The department also announced that June’s previously reported unemployment rate of 4.7 was confirmed. Job gains in June were revised significantly upward from 4,100 to 7,100 jobs.

The national unemployment rate was at 3.9 percent in July. In July 2017 , the national unemployment rate was 4.3 percent.

Employment Security paid unemployment insurance benefits to 47,711 people in July.

The state’s labor force in July was 3,763,300 – an increase of 3,100 people from the previous month. In the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region, the labor force increased by 300 over the same period.

From July 2017 through July 2018, the state’s labor force grew by 30,300 and the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region increased by 31,700 .

The labor force is the total number of people, both employed and unemployed, over the age of 16.

Private sector employment increased by 11,900 while the public sector added 500 jobs in July. This month’s report shows the greatest private job growth occurred in professional & business services up 4,200, retail trade up 3,100, manufacturing up 1,700, wholesale trade up 1,600 and information up 1,500. Other sectors adding jobs were education & health services and government both up 500 and construction up 300.

The number of jobs in the mining and logging sector remained constant in July.

Financial activities experienced the biggest reduction in July losing 500 jobs while leisure & hospitality and other services both lost 200 jobs and transportation, warehousing & utilities lost 100 jobs.

Washington added an estimated 102,500 new jobs from July 2017 through July 2018, not seasonally adjusted. The private sector grew by 3.7 percent, up an estimated 103,600 jobs, while the public sector decreased by 0.2 percent with a net loss of 1,100 jobs.

From July 2017 through July 2018, twelve industry sectors added jobs while only the public sector lost jobs.

The three industry sectors with the largest employment gains year-over-year, not seasonally adjusted, were:
  • Professional & business services with 25,600 new jobs;
  • Education & health services with 17,100 new jobs; and
  • Retail trade with 13,400 new jobs.


Note: The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently updated its “alternative measures of labor underutilization,” or U-6 rate, for states to include the first quarter of 2018. The U-6 rate considers not only the unemployed population in the official U-3 unemployment rate, but also “the underemployed and those not looking but wanting a job.” The U-6 rate for Washington through the first quarter 2018 was 9.0 percent compared to the national rate of 8.3 percent. Washington’s U-6 rate is the lowest it has been since 2007.
Manufactured 'Border Crisis' Has Real Human Consequences
Former SP publisher Tom Herriman recently visited the US southern border and filed the attached report in his podcast. (See News Digest.)

Tom's Podcast

Husky Fans: Tired of Being Turned Away with your Pet from UW Events?
This costume may be the solution to your problem.

Latter Day 'Greetings'
Greetings from the President of the United States!

Your friends and neighbors have selected you to help make America great again by participating in an innovative program in international relations.

Along with other selected citizens, you will receive an all-expense paid trip from a designated US point of departure to Russia, where you will be interrogated by friendly officials of the State Security Service (AKA KGB, GRU, or whatever replacement euphemistic acronym they may choose).

Prepare now! You will be notified when to arrive at the point of departure (you will be responsible for costs of travel within the US). Bring a toothbrush and several changes of underwear.

Sincerely,
John Bolton, Program Manager and Chief Apologist


Note to trumpeteers and the very young: This message is in the style of WWII draft notices. The difference is that none who are drafted will be bolstered by millions of volunteers. Oh, and for trumpeteers only: This is satire.
WA Jobs Report Shows Continued Growth
OLYMPIA – Washington’s economy added 4,100 jobs in June and the state’s seasonally adjusted monthly unemployment rate for June was 4.7 percent according to the Employment Security Department. The June unemployment rate was unchanged from May 2018 unemployment rate of 4.7 percent.

“Payroll growth slowed a bit in June compared with last May,” said Paul Turek, economist for the department. “What’s positive is that the consecutive string of jobs added per month continues and is scheduled to reach six years next month.

The Employment Security Department released the preliminary job estimates from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics as part of its Monthly Employment Report. The department also announced that May’s previously reported unemployment rate of 4.8 percent was slightly lower at 4.7 percent. Job gains in May were revised upward from 8,500 to 8,700 jobs.

The national unemployment rate was at 4.0 percent in June. In June 2017 last year, the national unemployment rate was 4.3 percent.

Employment Security paid unemployment insurance benefits to 45,868 people in June.

The state’s labor force in June was 3,760,500 – an increase of 100 people from the previous month. However, in the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region, the labor force decreased by 2,600 over the same period.

From June 2017 through June 2018, the state’s labor force grew by 38,800 and the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region increased by 36,300.

The labor force is the total number of people, both employed and unemployed, over the age of 16.

Nine sectors expanded and four contracted. Private sector employment increased by 4,800 while the public sector lost 700 jobs in June.

This month’s report shows the greatest private job growth occurred in professional & business services up 3,800, information up 1,000, and transportation, warehousing & utilities up 900. Other sectors adding jobs were education & health services up 600, wholesale trade and manufacturing both up 300, retail trade and leisure & hospitality both up 200, and other services up 100.

Construction experienced the biggest reduction in June losing 2,200 jobs while government lost 700 jobs, financial activities lost 300 jobs and mining & logging lost 100 jobs. Year-over-year growth is strong. Washington added an estimated 83,500 new jobs from June 2017 through June 2018, not seasonally adjusted. The private sector grew by 2.9 percent, up an estimated 80,500 jobs, and the public sector increased by 0.5 percent, adding 3,000 jobs.

From June 2017 through June 2018, all thirteen industry sectors added jobs. The three industry sectors with the largest employment gains year-over-year, not seasonally adjusted, were Professional & business services with 17,500 new jobs;
Retail trade with 17,400 new jobs; and Education & health services with 13,800 new jobs.
Summer in DC
Fun in the Sun!

Alaska Legislature May Ponder Requiring Russian Language in Public Schools
Moved by Pres. Trump's performance in Helsinki, the Alaska Legislature has reportedly appointed a panel to consider requiring the study of Russian in the state's public schools.

No one in the legislature or the state Republican party has confirmed or denied that the Trump government may soon return Alaska to Russia as part of a strategic global plan so clever that no one can figure it out.

The idea of a withdrawal of the US was prompted by a statement by Pres. Trump in 2016, when he asserted "Seward's Folly, as I call, it many people called it that at the time, I call it that now, as do many other people, as I learned at the Wharton School while Hillary was in Benghazi scheming to hide her emails, was a bad deal, a very bad deal, one of the worst deals ever for America, many people opposed it, $720 million down the drain, sad" to a campaign crowd. (The actual amount paid by the US was $7.2 million, and US Treasury revenue from Alaska in 2015 was $5,717.6 billion.)

He continued "..." (omitted for brevity and the sensibilities of thinking people everywhere).

One ranking member of the state senate, who asked not to be identified, stated the reasoning this way: "The meeting made it pretty clear that accommodating Russian political objectives will become an ever more important aspect of US foreign policy, As we've learned from the case of other states, when Trump grabs his ankles in the parlor, citizens should be waiting in the bedroom with a smile."

Some support for the addition of Russian to school curricula has previously been attributed fo descendants of pre-1863 Russian settlers in the vast territory.

"I'm sick and tired of people mispronouncing my name," said Rep. Nikolas Rapemenow, referring to the correct pronunciation Ra-pem-me-noff of the original Cyrillic spelling,

The Trump family has strong roots in the region. Pres. Trump's grandfather was a well known bordello operator there during the Gold Rush era (graphic).

We'll have community reaction from other parts of the state in a forthcoming edition.

Trump Family Alaska History

Lynnwood Non-profit Partners with UW Bothell to Promote Latino Event
Three University of Washington Bothell courses with a total of 50 students are engaged in community-based learning and research (CBLR) projects this summer with the Latino Educational Training Institute (LETI), a Lynnwood-based nonprofit that serves the Latino community in south Snohomish County.

UW Bothell started its partnership with LETI three years ago, and some faculty involve their classes almost every quarter, said Kara Adams, UW Bothell's director of community engagement. The University has dozens of such partner organizations and businesses, and LETI is one of just six on its community engagement council, she added.

The students' projects in these courses all relate to the annual Latino Expo, scheduled for Aug. 4 at Edmonds Community College where as many as 1,000 people will enjoy food, music and cultural dance along with educational workshops and medical screening. As part of its mission to strengthen community ties, the expo also showcases products and services for and by the Latino community.

Read more

WA Secretary of State Cautions RE Non-profit Fraud Scheme
Secretary of State Kim Wyman is cautioning Washington business owners to be aware of a misleading and potentially fraudulent mailing that purports to be an official bill related to business registration requirements, according to a press release today from Washington Non-profits, a statewide service organization. Nonprofits are targets of this phishing scheme and we caution all nonprofits to be on the look out for this letter.

“We’re working with the Attorney General’s Office – the agency that investigates and prosecutes consumer fraud – to see if further action should be taken to protect businesses in Washington,” said Wyman, whose office includes the Corporations and Charities Division.

A mailing sent recently to an Edmonds business requested $121.86 be sent to an Olympia post office box by July 31. It warned that “your state annual report will not be filed until payment is received.” However, the mailing does not mention the Office of Secretary of State or include its logo, which can be found on all official correspondence.

Wyman added that any business owner who receives a registration-related bill from an unknown third-party company should contact the Attorney General’s consumer protection division or file an online complaint at atg.wa.gov/fileacomplaint.aspx.

Similar solicitations in the past several years have resulted in an investigation and legal action taken against the senders of the fraudulent letters. Businesses and charities in Washington can always verify their filing status with the Office of Secretary of State by visiting the website, sos.wa.gov/corps. Registration-related questions can be answered at (360) 725-0377 or e-mailed to corps@sos.wa.gov.

Washington’s Office of Secretary of State oversees a number of areas within state government, including managing state elections, registering business entities and charities, and governing the use of the state flag and state seal. The office also manages the State Archives and the State Library, as well as documents extraordinary stories in Washington’s history through Legacy Washington.

Press Release

Solid gain in payroll employment, unemployment rate little changed
OLYMPIA – Washington’s economy added 7,100 jobs in April and the state’s seasonally adjusted monthly unemployment rate for April was 4.8 percent according to the Employment Security Department. The April unemployment rate was slightly higher than the revised estimated March 2018 unemployment rate of 4.7 percent.

“Washington’s employment situation remains on a positive course,” said Paul Turek, economist for the department. “Jobs keep being added each successive month and the unemployment rate has been at or around 4.8 percent for more than a year.”

The Employment Security Department released the preliminary job estimates from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics as part of its Monthly Employment Report. The department also announced that March’s previously reported unemployment rate of 4.8 percent was revised slightly lower to 4.7 percent. Job gains in March were revised upward from 3,900 to 5,100 jobs.

The national unemployment rate was at 3.9 percent in April. In April 2017 last year, the national unemployment rate was 4.4 percent.

Employment Security paid unemployment insurance benefits to 56,813 people in April.

Labor force decreased slightly in Washington

The state’s labor force in April was 3,760,800 - a decrease of 700 people from the previous month. However, in the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region, the labor force increased by 1,300 over the same period.

From April 2017 through April 2018, the state’s labor force grew by 59,600 and the Seattle/Bellevue/Everett region increased by 47,600.

The labor force is the total number of people, both employed and unemployed, over the age of 16.

Nine sectors expand, three contract and one remained constant

Private sector employment increased by 6,500 while the public sector gained 600 jobs in April.

This month’s report shows the greatest private job growth occurred in construction up 2,100, education & health services up 1,900, professional & business services up 1,800 and leisure & hospitality up 1,200. Other sectors adding jobs were government up 600, wholesale trade up 500, other services up 200, with information and mining & logging both up 100.

Retail trade experienced the biggest reduction in April losing 600 jobs while manufacturing lost 500 jobs and financial activities lost 300 jobs.

Transportation, warehousing & utilities was the only sector that remained unchanged.

Year-over-year growth remains strong

Washington added an estimated 85,100 new jobs from April 2017 through April 2018, not seasonally adjusted. The private sector grew by 3 percent, up an estimated 80,200 jobs, and the public sector increased by 0.8 percent, adding 4,900 jobs.

From April 2017 through April 2018, all thirteen industry sectors added jobs.

The three industry sectors with the largest employment gains year-over-year, not seasonally adjusted, were:
Education and health services with 16,600 new jobs;
Retail trade with 16,300 new jobs; and
Professional and business services with 13,000 new jobs.